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The Modular River Survey

Assessing the quality of physical habitat and functioning of river systems is vital for making sure that their management can sustain a healthy aquatic environment for our water dependent wildlife as well as providing fresh water and flood protection for our communities.

The Modular River Survey – or ModRS – is a new way for river enthusiasts and citizen scientists to get involved with recording and assessing physical habitat and hydromorphological functioning in their local rivers and streams.

Using a geomorphological approach, ModRS provides three ways to get involved:

1. Modular River Physical (MoRPh) survey

A habitat-scale assessment that characterises the local physical structure of a river channel and its margins relevant to ecological indicators such as river fly (macroinvertebrates), fish or aquatic plants (macrophytes). The survey is typically conducted over a river length of 10 to 40m. Data are entered into the MoRPh database by trained surveyors via a log-in. The value of 14 indicators extracted from the survey data can then be mapped and downloaded from the database along with the raw data.

2. MultiMoRPh survey

A sequence of 10 or more adjacent MoRPh surveys giving a more comprehensive audit of river habitats and allow characterisation of the way a river and its margins are adjusting to local controlling factors and recent events over a river sub-reach of 100 to 400m in length.

COMING SOON: Automatic extraction and mapping of a set of sub-reach scale MultiMoRPh indicators.

3. HydroMoRPh survey

A reach-scale (e.g. 1 to 10 km) assessment using aerial images (air photos, maps, remote sensing) and the outputs of MoRPh and Multi-MoRPh surveys to characterise changing pressures within a river reach and changes in river form and structure at the reach scale and over an extended period of time (e.g. 50+ years) in response to historic events.

COMING SOON: information on how to combine MoRPh and Multi-MoRPh outputs with an historical assessment of changing pressures and responses to identify the degree and trajectory of historical (and potential future) reach-scale changes and their likely causes  

ModRS outputs will be of interest to anyone working within catchment partnerships or local groups with an interest in river monitoring and assessment. Records are stored in the ModRS database with outputs visible on catchment maps on this website.

 

If you are interested in training, details are available on the Training page.

For any other  information about MoRPh contact Angela Gurnell via the form below: